Of Things Great and Small

There is such a crazy amount of difference between looking up and looking down. When we look down we are often presented with the "insignificant" the "overlooked" and the all but forgotten.  But if you open your eyes to those little overlooked and insignificant things you will be presented with a miniature world of wonder. So take time to get down low and take some time to appreciate the little world at your feet.Sometimes it is the littlest things that make the biggest impressions.

Little scenes of beauty are all around us waiting for you to find them. Shot with the Olympus OM-D E-M5 and 12-50mm

Little scenes of beauty are all around us waiting for you to find them.

Shot with the Olympus OM-D E-M5 and 12-50mm

 

Now take what we talked about above and spin it 180 degrees and you end up with the heavens above. So overwhelmingly vast in their expanse that the human mind can barely grasp the concept of their scale. It is when we look up that we realize how small our world is and how short our time on it really is. But that brevity, that minor place our world fills in the vastness of the galaxy is so full of life, and wonder, and beauty that for you to not try and capture it and bring it to as many people's lives as possible is not acceptable. You as a photographer have the tools, the vision, and I do hope, the passion to share this beauty and awesomeness of existence with as many people as you can in your blink of time on this planet. 

I know that sounds so grandiose, maybe even vain that we have this power to see what others don't. But I ask you this, do you really think everyone around you appreciates the beauty in the world that you seem to find so easily?

Forgive me if this was a bit rambling and loose but I love this world and I never seem to tire of the abundance of incredible things to see and photograph. And I never tire of sharing them.

I often find myself feeling humbled when looking up. Shot with the Olympus OM-D E-M5 and 9-18mm

I often find myself feeling humbled when looking up.

Shot with the Olympus OM-D E-M5 and 9-18mm